Costume Contacts

Creepy costume lenses might add a spine-tingling thrill to your Halloween costume, but wearing costume contact lenses without a prescription can lead to serious eye infections or permanent vision loss.

A poorly fitted contact lens can easily scrape the cornea, the outer layer of the eye, making the eye more vulnerable to infection-causing bacteria and viruses. In some extreme cases, infections can create scarring so severe it can permanently affect your vision.

Although it is illegal to sell non-prescription contact lenses, they are available at costume shops, gas stations, and online. Research shows that people who purchase contacts without a prescription face an increased risk of developing an infection.

The following types can help you protect your sight, while still giving you that ghoulish look for this Halloween.

  • See an eye care professional to receive a prescription for costume contact lenses.
    Packaging that claims “one size fits all” or “no need to see an eye doctor” is false. Get
    properly fitted by an optometrist.
  • Properly care for contact lenses. Even if you have a prescription for contact lenses,
    proper care remains essential.
  • Never share contacts. Pink eye isn’t a good look, even for a costume. Sharing contacts
    can spread germs, causing conditions such as pink eye, which is highly contagious.
  • Never overwear or sleep in contact lenses. Costume contacts are not meant for long
    term use as they do not allow enough oxygen to the cornea. It is best to wear them for
    occasional use like costume parties or special events. We suggest not wearing them any
    longer than eight hours.
  • Spread the word to others about the dangers of costume contacts. Don’t let friends
    make the mistake of wearing costume contacts without a prescription.

If your eyes the next morning give you a fright, make sure to call the Mabee Eye Clinic for help.

Myths and Facts: Contact Lenses

Are you a contact lens wearer? If so, you’ve probably heard some myths about wearing contact lenses. Typically, these contact lens myths grow from an unusual experience or misunderstanding information. Many contact lens myths are based on the way contact lenses used to be, instead of the current design and technology of contact lenses. We wanted to debunk some of the contact lens myths and give you the facts instead!

1.I’m too old to wear contact lenses

Fact: Anyone, at any age can wear contact lenses. Many older adults choose to wear contact lenses instead of reading glasses.

2. Contact lenses will get lost behind my eye

Fact: It is physically impossible for a contact lens to get lost behind your eye. A membrane covers your eye which connects inside your eyelids to prevent anything from getting behind your eye.

3. Contact lenses are uncomfortable

Fact: Modern contact lenses are thin and soft, making them very comfortable and often unnoticeable to wear. Some of the early contact lenses made 40-50 years ago were uncomfortable. However, we recommend you try modern contact lenses before sticking with this assumption.

4. Contact lenses can get stuck on my eye

Fact: If you follow proper wear, care, and removal advice from your eye doctor your contact lens cannot get stuck to your eye. Should your lens feel dry, apply some rewetting drops, and they should loosen right up.

5. Contact lenses are too much trouble to take care of

Fact: Daily disposable contact lenses make lens care irrelevant. You wear them one day and throw them out when you are done. However, reusable contact lens care is relatively simple with modern solutions. Most contact lenses can be cleaned and stored using one multi-use contact lens solution.

6. I’ll never be able to put in contact lenses

Fact: Our staff will show and teach you how to put in contact lenses. We ensure that you are confident in your abilities to put in and take out your contacts before you leave our office. Most people can figure it out after a handful of tries!

7. Contacts can pop out of my eye

Fact: Properly fitted contact lenses should never pop out of your eye. Typically, the only way a contact lens will move is shifting around your eye. Therefore blinking a few times or closing your eyelid and gently pressing on it should move the lens right back into place.

8. Contact lenses are too expensive

Fact: The cost of contact lenses varies depending on brand, replacement schedule, and how often you wear them. Typically, the price is comparable to a new pair of glasses. Above all our team will help you select contact lenses that work best for your lifestyle and your budget.

9. Children and teenagers cannot wear contacts

Fact: There is no age restriction on wearing contacts. Anyone can wear contact lenses; ultimately it depends on enthusiasm, responsibility, and maturity. Our staff can advise whether contact lenses are a suitable option for your child.

If you have more questions about contact lenses, give our office a call! We want to help you feel confident in your knowledge of contact lenses.

Multifocal Contact Lenses

Multifocal contact lenses are yet another way to tackle presbyopia, a condition making it difficult to focus on objects up close. Presbyopia, or farsightedness, affects nearly 111 million people in the United States with a large effect on individuals in their mid 40’s. If you suffer from near and farsighted vision, you may have thought glasses were your only option for corrective lenses. Think again! Similar to progressive or bifocal lenses , you can also wear bifocal or multifocal contact lenses to provide a natural transition between your near and distance vision.

What is presbyopia?

Presbyopia, a very common refractive error often referred to as age-related farsightedness, is a gradual, age-related loss in the ability to clearly view up-close objects. If you begin experiencing eye strain after reading or are holding reading materials at an arm’s length away to clearly view, schedule a visit with us to talk about your vision. While there is no way to stop or reverse the effects of presbyopia, factors that can lead to a higher risk of developing presbyopia include age, medical conditions, and drug use. Our practice offers a wide range of eyecare services, and vision correction including frames, lenses, and contact lens options to fit your vision needs and keep you seeing your best.

Why Use Multifocal Contact Lenses?

Multifocal contact lenses create a more natural viewing for the wearer because both eyes are corrected for distance and near vision. There are a variety of options available for multifocal contact lenses that can be worn depending on your preferences and lifestyle. From single and part-time to everyday use, there is a multifocal contact lens option for you.

If you have started experiencing signs of farsightedness and are interested in multifocal contact lenses, schedule your next appointment today to talk with our team. It is much easier to adjust the multifocal lens correction provided on lower prescription needs. If you have a strong prescription and would like to try multifocal contact lenses, contact our office today.

The Pros and Cons

Pros of Multifocal Contact Lenses

  • Convenient to use
  • Provide a variety of powers in one lens to allow for great vision at all distances
  • Offer a smooth transition between different prescriptions without the distinct lines found in bifocal contact lenses

Cons of Multifocal Contact Lenses

  • Some wearers find their vision is not perfect at both near and distance, in these situations a compromise is made so one distance vision is better than the other.
  • Adjustments are difficult with higher prescriptions
  • More difficult to adjust when compared with standard contact lenses
  • People who suffer from dry eyes may have more difficulty wearing contact lenses, which may not make the multifocal lenses a good solution to their presbyopia.

Types of Multifocal Contact Lenses

Simultaneous Design

The simultaneous vision design provides a gradual change between near and distance vision. Different zones of the lens are made for near, far, and intermediate vision providing a more natural transition and viewing experience.

Concentric and aspheric lenses are the most common simultaneous vision designs. The concentric design allows for the center of the lens to be the primary viewing zone and the rings around it gradually switch between near and distance vision. Aspheric lenses have a more gradual shift in prescription throughout the lens.

Segmented Design

Segmented contact lenses have a bifocal design. The distance vision is in the upper and central parts of the lens and the near vision is in the lower section of the lens. The two zones are separated by a visible line. When the user looks down the contact lens remains in place due to the flattened bottom edge.

Multifocal Contact Lenses - INTERNAL IMAGE

Ready to try out multifocal contact lenses? Give us a call or schedule your next appointment today!

Contact Lenses – Just the Facts

Although it’s unlikely that demand for traditional glasses will ever disappear altogether (after all, they’re stylish, comfortable, and convenient), contact lenses have been popular for decades and continue to be a great choice for eyewear. From typical prescription options, to ones that change the color of the eye, to futuristic “smart” lenses—contacts have come a long way since 1888!

Contact lenses are a great alternative to wearing glasses for many people because they offer a lot of flexibility. You can wear your non-prescription sunglasses, goggles, helmets, headbands, or other kinds of eyewear over your contacts. People with contact lenses don’t have to worry about glasses slipping off or getting knocked off with physical activity. Plus, contacts don’t fog up and won’t produce a glare in photos. Unless you’re up close to someone, you can’t even tell they’re wearing them.

There is a wide variety of contact lenses available to fit most people. Advances in recent years have created many options with cool features perfectly suited to a range of prescription types and eyewear needs.

Toric lenses are used for people with astigmatism (irregular curvature of the eye). The way that toric contacts work is they have different powers at various places on the lens and they stay in place on the eye with a weighted section so that they don’t rotate. Unlike a regular prescription contact lens that can rotate and give consistently clear vision, the toric lenses have to stay in one position. Most wearers will never notice the weighted section. Usually the “weight” is just a tiny line in the lens, adding a small amount of material to orient the lens. With the lens on your fingertip up to the light, you may be able to see the line, but it is imperceptible when the contact lens is in place on your eye.

Gas permeable lenses are not soft and flexible like the ones most people imagine when they think of contact lenses. The rigid lenses still have breathability for air to reach your eye, but they are rigid. By keeping their perfectly rounded shape, the lenses can help give clear vision to people with astigmatism. The downside is that some people find them hard to become accustomed to wearing because they feel the lens more than they feel soft lenses.

People who need reading glasses or progressive lenses can benefit from bifocal and multifocal lenses. These are designed for those who require more than one prescription in the same lens—a common need among people over forty due to common age-related vision loss known as presbyopia.

Hybrid lenses are made of a rigid middle zone and a soft outer rim. They are specially designed for high astigmatism, certain irregular corneas, and people with early stage keratoconus. People with these conditions used to be limited to glasses, but hybrid lenses make it possible for them to wear contact lenses.

Conditions such as keratoconus, dry eyes, giant papillary conjunctivitis, post-refractive surgery (such as LASIK), and presbyopia can make contact lens fitting more difficult, but most people are able to find contact lenses to comfortably fit their eyes and needs. If you want to try contact lenses, talk to your eye care professional about which options are best for you!

Mabee Eye Clinic